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Brood cicadas

Brood X Cicadas Are Emerging at Last

At this very instant, in backyards and forests across the eastern U.S., one of nature’s greatest spectacles is underway. Although it may lack the epic majesty of the wildebeest migration in the Serengeti or the serene beauty of cherry blossom season in Japan, this event is no less awe-inspiring. I’m talking about the emergence of…

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Biodiversity Conservation

Biodiversity Conservation Should Start at Biden’s Backyard

The manicured Rose Garden at the White House as of August, 2020. Credit: Drew Angerer Getty Images In 1908, when President Teddy Roosevelt was asked about what birds could be seen around the White House, he listed an impressive 93 species. That list included iconic Mid-Atlantic breeding birds like Eastern whip-poor-wills and Baltimore orioles. Unfortunately,…

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Defibrillator Subcutaneous

Why Was a Subcutaneous Defibrillator Removed Within 1 Year?

A 50-year-old man presents with palpitations and lightheadedness to a hospital in Omaha, Nebraska, upon transfer from another facility. He has a history of nonischemic cardiomyopathy (left ventricular ejection fraction of 25%) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Eight months previously, he had undergone placement of a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD). His records show that 6…

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Abrocitinib Flexible

Flexible Abrocitinib Dosing Effective in Atopic Dermatitis

Abrocitinib, a once-daily oral Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) inhibitor, showed long-term efficacy at doses of 100 mg or 200 mg in patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, according to a recent study presented at the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) virtual meeting. In this exclusive MedPage Today video, study author Andrew Blauvelt, MD, MBA, president of…

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Blood Thinners

Blood Thinners Continue at End of Life, Despite Risks

A third of elderly people with severe dementia and atrial fibrillation received an anticoagulant drug during the last 6 months of their life, an analysis of Medicare patients showed. Nursing home length of stay and not having Medicaid were more strongly associated with anticoagulant use compared with stroke risk (CHA2DS2-VASc score), reported Gregory Ouellet, MD,…

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deaths Obesity-Related

Deaths From Obesity-Related Cancers on the Rise

Overall mortality rates for cancer continue to decline in the U.S., but since 2011 that decline has slowed for obesity-associated cancers, likely due to the obesity epidemic, researchers reported. The mortality trends for obesity-associated cancers mirror those for heart disease, according to Christy Avery, PhD, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and…

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Airborne virus

CDC: Virus Can Be Airborne; Fauci Mulls Less Indoor Masking; Pfizer Vax Heartache?

Note that some links may require registration or subscription. Updated language on the CDC website now explicitly states airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2 is possible, meaning the virus can be inhaled even when individuals are more than 6 feet apart. (New York Times) NIAID Director Anthony Fauci, MD, predicted that indoor masking guidance may soon be…

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Running steps

11 Steps That Will Get You Running Your First Mile

How to start running can seem like an overwhelming or intimidating question, especially if you’ve never tried it before, or if your experience with it begins and ends with laps doled out by a middle-school P.E. coach. When you’re new to running, every minute can feel like an hour, and the thought of moving a…

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After Schools

How Schools Can Help Kids Heal After the Pandemic’s Uncertainty

By Cory Turner, NPR and Christine Herman, WILL / Illinois Public Media May 10, 2021 We encourage organizations to republish our content, free of charge. Here’s what we ask: You must credit us as the original publisher, with a hyperlink to our khn.org site. If possible, please include the original author(s) and “Kaiser Health News”…

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making Reluctant

The Making of Reluctant Activists: A Police Shooting in a Hospital Forces One Family to Rethink American Justice

The beer bottle that cracked over Christian Pean’s head unleashed rivulets of blood that ran down his face and seeped into the soil in which Harold and Paloma Pean were growing their three boys. At the time, Christian was a confident high school student, a football player in the suburbs of McAllen, Texas, a border…