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Chris Cillizza’s winners and losers from the Nevada caucuses

(CNN)The Nevada caucuses — the third vote of the 2020 Democratic nomination fight — are over. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders was the big winner, claiming his second straight victory and heading into the South Carolina’s primary next Saturday with a considerable amount of momentum. It was a far tougher night for the like of Sens.…

(CNN)The Nevada caucuses — the third vote of the 2020 Democratic nomination fight — are over.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders was the big winner, claiming his second straight victory and heading into the South Carolina’s primary next Saturday with a considerable amount of momentum. It was a far tougher night for the like of Sens. Elizabeth Warren (Massachusetts) and Amy Klobuchar (Minnesota).
Below, an extended look at the best and worst from the day — and night — that was.

WINNERS

Bernie Sanders: Yes, the Vermont democratic socialist was the favorite in Nevada going into the caucuses. But few people projected such a sweeping win — not only doubling the support of the second-place finisher, but doing so in ways (most notably his huge support among Latinos) that suggest he is on his way to building a national coalition. The dynamic of the race is now very simple: Sanders is the clear front-runner, and everyone else in the field is vying to be the Sanders alternative.
Pete Buttigieg: The most important thing the former South Bend, Indiana, mayor did in Nevada was the speech he gave after it was clear Sanders was going to win. Buttigieg used the national spotlight to make a very savvy play to be the Sanders alternative. He savaged Sanders’ “inflexible, ideological revolution that leaves out most Democrats, not to mention most Americans” and decried the “tenor of combat, division and polarization” of the Sanders supporters. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, a prominent Sanders backer, tweeted “dude, show some humility” to Buttigieg in the wake of the speech. Mission accomplished for Team Buttigieg.
Joe Biden: After finishing fourth in Iowa and fifth in New Hampshire, the former vice president badly needed some good news. And Nevada gave him just enough of that to keep him going for another week, through the South Carolina primary. But there’s warning signs everywhere for Biden in the numbers; he got crushed by Sanders among Latinos, won black voters over Sanders by less than double-digits and played to a tie with Sanders among moderate voters. Biden desperately has to win South Carolina, and Sanders’ demonstrated strength across a broad coalition is very problematic there.
Electability: Two thirds of Nevada caucus-goers said they would prefer a candidate who can beat President Donald Trump rather than someone who agrees with them on issues. That’s very similar to the number who opted for electability in Iowa and New Hampshire, and serves as yet another reminder of just how important beating the incumbent is for a broad swath of Democrati

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