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Forensic Genealogy

DNA, forensic genealogy close 65-year-old dual homicide

GREAT FALLS, Mont. (AP) — DNA evidence preserved after a 1956 double homicide and the use of forensic genealogy has helped a Montana sheriff’s office close the books on the 65-year-old cold case, officials said.Investigators with the Cascade County Sheriff’s Office concluded Kenneth Gould — who died in Oregon County, Missouri, in 2007 — more…

GREAT FALLS, Mont. (AP) — DNA evidence maintained following a 1956 double homicide and the use of forensic genealogy has helped a Montana sheriff’s office near the books on the 65-year old cold instance, officials said.

Investigators using the Cascade County Sheriff’s Office concluded Kenneth Gould — who perished in Oregon County, Missouri, in 2007 — more than probably killed Patricia Kalitzke, 16, and Duane Bogle, 18, the Great Falls Tribune reports. Both were shot in the mind.

(*)Detective Sgt. Jon Kadner, who took over the case in 2012, said Tuesday it had been the oldest case he could find nationally that’s been solved with forensic genealogy, which hunts commercial DNA databases to find familial suits to the DNA of a crime suspect.

On Jan. 3, 1956, three boys hiking across the Sun River near Wadsworth Park northwest of Great Falls located Bogle dead near his car. A day after, a county road worker found Kalitzke’s entire body north of Great Falls.

(Decision )Kalitzke was a junior at Great Falls High School, also Bogle was an airman in Malmstrom Air Force Base from Waco, Texas.

(*)Officers researched for many years, but they had been not able to make an arrest.

The case went cold for decades until 2001, when then-Detective Phil Matteson delivered the slide of a vaginal swab gathered from Kalitzke’s entire body to the Montana State Crime Lab for analysis. The lab found a sperm cell which didn’t belong to Bogle, officials stated.

In the next years, law enforcement compared the DNA sample to approximately 35 other men, including gangster James Joseph”Whitey” Bulger Jr.. They were ruled out as suspects.

When Matteson retired, he said he did not believe the case would be solved. “A lot of different people had a turn at this, and we just weren’t able to take it to conclusion,” he explained.

In 2018, however, forensic gen

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