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Dow set to tumble 600 points as coronavirus roller coaster continues

New York (CNN Business)US stocks remain extremely volatile, and after two 1,000-point gains and an 800-point loss this week, the Dow is once again set for a big drop. Coronavirus confusion is far from over. Dow (INDU) futures tumbled Thursday morning, signaling that the market would open down more than 600 points, or about 1.7%.…

New York (CNN Business)US stocks remain extremely volatile, and after two 1,000-point gains and an 800-point loss this week, the Dow is once again set for a big drop. Coronavirus confusion is far from over.

Dow (INDU) futures tumbled Thursday morning, signaling that the market would open down more than 600 points, or about 1.7%. The S&P 500 (SPX) was set to open 1.9% lower and the Nasdaq (COMP) was on pace to open down 1.8%.
The roller coaster of a week has given investors whiplash. The Dow posted two of its best days in history in terms of points gained on Monday and Wednesday, and one of its worst point losses Tuesday.
Those wild swings stem from mixed signals about the economy: The coronavirus outbreak threatens to seriously dent global growth, but how long will the downturn last? The Fed shocked Wall Street Tuesday with an emergency rate cut to give businesses and households a boost, but what message does that send about America’s economic resilience. Former Vice President Joe Biden won sweeping primary victories across the country Tuesday, but does that mean Wall Street is about to lose its cheerleader-in-chief President Donald Trump?
CNN Business’ Fear and Greed Index has been stuck in “Extreme Fear” for more than a week. The VIX volatility index soared 14% Thursday, and investors plowed money into safe-haven assets like gold and US Treasury bonds. Gold was up 0.3% and the 10-year Treasury yield fell again, nearing its all-time low set Tuesday. The Japanese yen, also a safe-haven in times of trouble, stood near a five-month high against the US dollar.
And despite two days of huge gains this week, stocks remain near correction territory.
Stocks have gotten hammered, because investors question the underlying fundamentals of their businesses: If coronavirus keeps people at home, travel and leisure companies will lose a lot of jet-setters and con

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