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Google Earth’s New Timelapse Feature Lets You See How Our Planet Has Changed In Four Decades

A timelapse look at the changing Aral Sea, Kazakhstan. The lake was once the world’s fourth largest … [+] body of inland water, but has been shrinking since the 1960s after the rivers that fed it were diverted by irrigation projects. Google Earth Google Earth newest Timelapse feature lets users look back from the current…

A timelapse look at the changing Aral Sea, Kazakhstan.

A timelapse look at the shifting Aral Sea, Kazakhstan. The lake was formerly the world’s fourth largest … [+] body of inland water, but was decreasing since the 1960s following the rivers that fed it were diverted by irrigation projects.

Google Earth

Google Earth newest Timelapse feature enables users look back in the present day all the way to 1984 and determine how both human action as ordinary forces have changed the face of Earth over the past 40 years, writes Rebecca Moore, director of Earth Engine & Outreach at Google Earth, at a public statement .

The new timelapse feature makes use of some 24 million satellite photographs accumulated by Google Earth in NASA, the US Geological Survey (USGS), the European Union, and the European Space Agency (ESA). Over two million processing hours were needed to process these 20 petabytes of imagery into one 4.4 terapixel-sized global, zoomable video mosaic.

Google itself has highlighted a Couple of areas of geological interest and generated a string of video animations:

Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines, where the huge 1991 eruption has been followed by years of mudflows that formed by the huge quantities of ash and rock that were deposited.

The Columbia Glacier that flows from the Chugach Mountains to a narrow fjord which contributes into Prince William Sound in southeastern Alaska. British explorers first surveyed it in 1794, its noseor terminus–stretched south to the northern edge of the drowned glacial valley. The glacier held the position till 1980, as it began a rapid retreat that continues now.

The shifting coastline around Chatham, Massachusetts. The alterations to this sandbars are sometimes subtle and sometimes dramatic. Storms cut new inlets through the beach, changing present patterns and following the erosion and deposition of sediments.

A timelapse look at the changing Aral Sea, Kazakhstan. The lake was once the world’s fourth largest body of inland water, but has been decreasing since the 1960s following the rivers that fed it were diverted by irrigation projects.

Open-pit mine in a coal mining district in southern Brandenburg. As Germany’s black coal industry evolves down, mines turn into lakes and new ecologically valuable biotopes.

The new vision is free to access and use, such as the rest of Google Earth, and will be updated yearly.

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