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Mystery Salmonella Oranienburg outbreak continues to grow

In the first update in two weeks, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that the Salmonella Oranienburg outbreak of unknown origin remains a mystery. And it’s a growing mystery. With 592 people now infected in 36 states. The outbreak picked up 173 new cases since CDC’s last report on Sept. 30, and during…

In the first update in two weeks, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that the Salmonella Oranienburg outbreak of unknown origin remains a mystery.

And it’s a growing mystery. With 592 people now infected in 36 states. The outbreak picked up 173 new cases since CDC’s last report on Sept. 30, and during that time, hospitalizations increased by 50 for a total of 116.

The investigation by CDC and the involved states has not identified a food source for the outbreak. They are collecting different types of data to investigate the multistate outbreak of Salmonella Oranienburg infections.

Epidemiologic data
Illness onset dates range from May 31 to Sept. 29.

Sick people range in age from less than one year to 97 years, with a median age of 36, and 57 percent are female.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

State and local public health officials continue to interview people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick. CDC is analyzing the data and has not identified a specific food item as a potential source of this outbreak.

Laboratory data
Whole-genome sequencing of bacteria from 556 people’s samples did not predict any antibiotic resistance.

Samples from three people predicted resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefoxitin, and ceftriaxone, gentamicin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline.

Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory is currently underway. Most people with Salmonella illness recover without antibiotics. However, if antibiotics are needed, this resistance is unlikely to affect the choice of antibiotic used to treat most people because it is rare.

About Salmonella
Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune system

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