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Solar eclipse guide 2022: When, where & how to see them

Home References Skywatching Our solar eclipse guide 2022 contains everything you need to know. (Image credit: 1001slide via Getty Images) There are two partial solar eclipses in 2022. The first partial solar eclipse will occur on Apr. 30 and be visible from parts of South America, Antarctica, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Then on Oct. 25,…


Our solar eclipse guide 2022 contains everything you need to know.

Our solar eclipse guide 2022 contains everything you need to know.
(Image credit: 1001slide via Getty Images)

There are two partial solar eclipses in 2022. April will see the first partial solar eclipse. 30 and be visible from parts of South America, Antarctica, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Then on Oct. 25, another partial solar eclipse will be visible over Europe, western Asia and northeast Africa.

A solar eclipse occurs when the new moon, which is otherwise invisible, makes a rare appearance by crossing in front of the sun’s face, slowly creating the appearance of a “bite” taken from the sun. This continues until the moon fully or partially blocks the sun’s disk.

For the first time since 2018, there will be no total or annular solar eclipse this year. The last total solar eclipse took place on Dec. 4, 2021 and was visible from Antarctica. There will be no total solar eclipse in 2022 however there are two total lunar eclipses, the first occurring on May 16, and visible across North and South America, Africa and Western Europe. On Nov. 8, the second lunar eclipse will be visible in North and South America, Africa, and Western Europe.

Related: The only total solar eclipse of 2021 in pictures: Amazing photos from Antarctica

Did you know?

A solar eclipse always occurs about two weeks before or after a lunar eclipse.

You can see a complete list of the upcoming solar eclipses on NASA’s eclipse website, which provides information about solar eclipses, including detailed maps of each eclipse path. Remember to start making plans for the next great American solar eclipse on April 8, 2024.

Partial solar eclipse on Apr. 30

The first partial solar eclipse of 2022 will sweep across the southeast Pacific and southern South America.

The first partial solar eclipse of 2022 will sweep across the southeast Pacific and southern South America. (Image credit: NASA)

The first partial solar eclipse of 2022 will sweep across the southeast Pacific and southern South America.

The first location to see the partial solar eclipse begin is at 1. 45 p.m. EST (18: 45 UTC), the greatest point of total solar eclipse occurs at 3. 41 p.m. EST (20: 41 UTC) and the last location to see the partial eclipse end is at 5. 37 p.m. EST (22: 37 UTC) according to Time and Date.

Below is a chart with some eclipse viewing times (all local times), featuring data from Time and Date.

Timetable for the partial solar eclipse on April. 30 (All times local)
Location Partial eclipse begins Maximum eclipse Partial eclipse ends % of sun covered
Puerto Williams, Chile 4: 46 p.m. 5: 57 p.m. 6: 04 p.m. 52%
Santiago, Chile 4: 33 p.m. 5: 36 p.m. 6: 03 p.m. 18%
Gastre, Chubut, Argentina 5: 12 p.m. 6: 21 p.m. 6: 42 p.m. 40%

Partial solar eclipse Oct. 25

The second partial solar eclipse of the year is viewable from Europe, western Asia and northeast Africa.

The second partial solar eclipse of the year is viewable from Europe, western Asia and northeast Africa. (Image credit: NASA)

The second partial solar eclipse of the year is viewable from Europe, western Asia and northeast Africa. The partial solar eclipse can be seen from Iceland at sunrise to western India at sunset. Those wishing to see the moon take the biggest “bite” out of the sun’s disk will have to venture some 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) to the east-northeast of Moscow in the West Siberian Plain where 82% of the sun’s area will be covered, according to Sky and Telescope.

Nevertheless, there are still plenty of good partial solar eclipse viewing opportunities across Europe, the Middle East, western Asia and northeast Africa. Below is a timetable for the partial solar eclipse on Oct. 25 (all times local).

The first location to see the partial solar eclipse begin is at 3. 58 a.m. EST (08: 58 UTC), the greatest point of total solar eclipse occurs at 6 a.m. EST (11: 00 UTC) and the last location to see the partial eclipse end is at 8: 02 a.m. EST (13: 02 UTC) according to Time and Date.

Below is a chart with some eclipse viewing times (all local times), featuring data from Time and Date.

Timetable for the partial solar eclipse on Oct. 25 (All times local)
Location Partial eclipse begins Maximum eclipse Partial eclipse ends % of sun covered
Reykjavik, Iceland 8: 58 a.m. 9: 46 a.m. 10: 35 a.m. 19%
London, United Kingdom 10: 08 a.m. 10: 59 a.m. 11: 51 a.m. 15%
Cairo, Egypt 12 p.m. 1: 09 p.m. 2: 16 p.m. 26%
Moscow, Russia 12: 24 p.m. 1: 38 p.m. 2: 51 p.m. 63%
Dubai, United Arab Emirates 2: 41 p.m. 3: 51 p.m. 4: 54 p.m. 39%
Delhi, India 4: 29 p.m. 5: 30 p.m. 5: 42 p.m. 44%

How to view the sun safely

NEVER look at the sun with binoculars, a telescope or your unaided eye with out special protection. Special filters are used by astronomers and astrophotographers to observe the sun safely during solar eclipses and other sun phenomena. Here’s our guide on how to observe the sun safely.

Solar eclipse viewing tips:

To safely observe the sun or watch an eclipse, you need special protective eyewear or eclipse glasses. Even basic sunglasses with UV protection won’t protect your eyes enough. You can use special solar filters to protect your eyes from the glare of the sun if you plan to photograph the eclipse using any type of photo equipment.

The safest way to observe an eclipse is indirectly, using a pinhole camera that you can make easily at home.

If you must document one of these events, a simple, wide-angle snap should capture the moment, even if you’re using your smartphone camera.

Editor’s Note: If you snap an amazing solar eclipse photo and would like to share it with Space.com’s readers, send your photo(s), comments, and your name and location to spacephotos@space.com.

Additional resources

Want to look further ahead? You can find a concise summary of solar eclipses through to 2030 on NASA’s eclipse website. Read more about solar and lunar eclipses on Eclipse Wise – a website dedicated to predictions of eclipses. Learn about eclipses on other planets with this short article from Cornell University’s astronomy department.

Bibliography

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Daisy Dobrijevic

Daisy is a Staff Writer for All About Space magazine. She holds a Master’s degree in Environmental Science and a PhD in Plant Physiology. Before joining All About Space, Daisy completed an editorial internship with the BBC Sky at Night Magazine and worked at the National Space Centre in Leicester, U.K., where she enjoyed communicating space science to the public. Daisy is currently based in Nottingham, U.K.

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